New iPhone 4S and the Rule of Thirds


Apple has launched the new iPhone 4S, which will be available tomorrow, Friday, October 14th.  I will be out-of-town, so will not join the masses and wait in lines outside of an Apple store, but am anxious to upgrade my current iPhone.  While Siri, the new voice-command assistant, sounds like a super cool tool, I’m not sure she’ll be able to answer me when I ask, “Can you finish the laundry?”  But to say, “Where’s the closest Starbucks?” and have Siri answer back with the exact location, is pretty darn amazing!  That said, the newest feature that I’m most excited about is the 8-megapixel camera.

The new camera will have photo editing capabilities that will allow you to crop your photos (right on your iPhone) and add grid lines to compose your photo by applying the Rule of Thirds.

 

By using the Rule of Thirds for composition, you will create more visually pleasing photographs.  The basic idea is to divide your image into thirds, both horizontally and vertically (imagine a tic-tac-toe grid) creating 9 equal squares.

The 4 intersection points on the grid are the spots where the main subjects and main elements of the composition should be placed, otherwise positioned along the grid lines.  In the example above (of a buoy marked #3, nonetheless), the tower of the buoy runs along the right vertical grid line, and the boat along the lower horizontal line.  The birds atop the buoy and the green #3 marker, sit right at an intersection point on the grid.

For more examples of the Rule of Thirds in photography, check out this post on Tecca.com.  The principle can also be applied in graphic design, where Fifth and Hazel illustrates some great examples, here.

I opted not to pre-order the phone online, and will just hope that the iPhone 4S doesn’t sell out tomorrow.  If so, I’m not sure how much longer I can wait, but I’ll be back from my trip next week, and will try to buy one then.

images: (1) via Apple.com (2) by Ei3s

 


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